Parasitic Infection in America

There’s no use denying it, reports of parasitic infection have been appearing more frequently, and in places you might not expect. Some estimates place the infection rate at 90% in the US alone. Another estimates shows that as many as 50% of preschool children are infected with pinworm. With symptoms like; chronic Fatigue, irregular digestion, and irritated bowels, many people will go through they life never suspecting that a parasitic infection is causing their symptoms. This is a major risk to the health of Americans, one which is still under the radar.

 

Why would Americans worry about parasites? Parasites are found in every economic climate, though they are more prevalent poorer countries. Literally every facet of our survival deal with parasites, such as in our food and drinking water. There are 150,000 different kinds of parasites, and there are even fewer laboratories that do broad spectrum tests.  Parasites are often discovered in surgery, during operation on a failed organ. Not only does this shock surgeons, but I’m certain it shocks patients as well.

Are you at risk? You may not believe your in the risk group. Well, you’re wrong. Do you eat food? Drink Water? (which I’m going to guess you do)  you are at risk for parasitic infection!

Roundworm from pets:  Most cats and dogs have a roundworm infection. By sleeping with your pet, you greatly increase the chance of getting a parasitic infection from them!

Raw fish:  Many parasites can be found in raw fish. Among them, the Anisakis roundworm. This worm can cause fatal organ damage if left untreated. Due to the lack of FDA inspectors, only 10% of fish is inspected. Even still, you cannot tell if a fish is infected just by looking it at. Many can only be viewed on the microscopic level. There no way to tell if fish you’r eating is safe. Cooking a fish thoroughly can help insure any parasites within the fish are killed.

Tap water: There have been many cases of parasitic infections spreading from contaminated tap water. Many hundreds of people have died from this. Many more people continued on, never knowing the sometimes fatal damage being done to them.

Food: Many foods you eat come from other countries, and there is no way to insure your food is not contaminated without giving it a good wash with soap. However, even if you buy local, that doesn’t mean the food is parasite free.

 

Common parasites found in human intestines:

Pork Tape Worm (Taenia Solium): Infections come from eating raw or under cooked pork  Larvae grow in the body, causing cysts which can occur in the brain, leading to seizure and death.

Round Worms: According to “The WHO” one billion people are infected with round worms. Growing over 14″ long, and laying 200,000 eggs each day, these worms can cause intestinal blockages. Symptoms include rashes, stomach pain, asthma, eye pain and more, often depending on what part of the body houses the infection.

Pin Worms: An infection commonly found in children. The CDC states in some countries the infection rate is as high as 61%. Children can often get pin worms from playing dirt. Usually there are no symptoms but itching of the anus. Children are at high risk for parasitic infections.

Giardia Parasite: Giardia is the most common intestinal parasites in people. Contaminated water, food, or soil. Symptoms may include fatigue, diarrhea, stomach cramps,   nausea, and chills.

Whip Worms: Infecting more then 500 million people, this worm can lay over 10.000 eggs per day. The eggs are often found in dry goods such as grains, beans, and rice.  This worm causes blood loss that will lead to anemia.

Hookworms: A microscopic worm that sucks  your blood through your intestinal wall. Damage to the intestinal wall causes blood loss, leading to anemia. This worm has been known to get into the heart, causing a fatal infection. Animal feces often carry hookworms.  There are few symptoms that accompany this infection, and are often not experienced until there is damage to the heart or intestines.

 

The best parasite cleanse:  Dr. Omar Amin’s parasite cleanse; “Freedom, Cleanse, Restore” can be found here

 

 

 

www.parasitetesting.com

www.youtube.com/watch

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/kenneth-watson-blinded-live-maggot-eats-eye/story?id=11306311

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/PainNews/eating-terrible-parasites/story?id=10879111

http://www.parasitology.com/news/archives/6_24_08.html

http://vodpod.com/watch/3310614-parasites-what-the-medical-doctor-will-not-tell-you-segment-1-of-3

http://altered-states.net/barry/newsletter371/index.htm

http://articles.latimes.com/2007/dec/31/health/he-briefly31.s6

 

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Researchers find bacteria causes a single celled organism to form colonies

Bacterial regulation of colony development in the closest living relatives of animals

Image from the research paper “Bacterial regulation of colony development in the closest living relatives of animals”.

(Phys.org) — Researchers working at a lab at Berkeley University, led by Nicole King, have uncovered the first example of a kind of bacteria that causes a single celled organism to form a colony, a finding that has implications for researchers looking into the origins of multi-celled organisms in general. The team has published their findings on the lab’s web site and their paper will appear in the first edition of the new open source journal eLIFE.

The team’s research centers on choanoflagellates, single celled organisms that swim around in water using their tails. In some settings, they swim around independently, while in others they form colonies in the shape of rosettes. King and her team spent several years trying to figure out why they sometimes go solo, and sometimes don’t. At one point, they applied an antibacterial agent to the environment in which specimens of organisms were living and found that afterwards, they all quit forming into colonies. That led to a search through some sixty strains of bacteria to determine which had caused the change. They finally found it, a new species, Algoriphagus machipongonensis. But of course, that was just the beginning. Next the team tore apart the bacteria trying to figure out what unique property it held that caused choanoflagellates to form into a colony. That led them to a lipid molecule they have named Rosette-Inducing Factor 1 (RIF-1). When choanoflagellates ingest the bacteria, they get a very tiny amount of RIF-1, and that is all it takes, apparently, for the daughter cells that are spawned to form the rosettes.
The findings have added importance because researchers have long thought that choanoflagellates are animals closest relative, which means that it’s possible that bacteria and the molecules they produce, could conceivably be part of the reason that single celled organisms first began to form colonies, leading eventually to multi-celled beings that evolved over time into all of the animals that are alive today.
Not everyone is onboard with that idea however, as over time, choanoflagellates have evolved just as have all the organisms that evolved from whatever the first multi-celled organisms actually were, but this new finding does hint at the possibility that we all owe our existence to a bacteria similar to A. machipongonensis living all those years ago.
There are still questions to be answered as well, such as what about RIF-1 causes the choanoflagellates to form colonies, and do they have to actually eat them to gain the ability to form the colonies or is just being around them enough? King’s team will no doubt be looking to answer such questions while other’s debate the significance of their findings. More information: Rosanna A. Alegado et al., Bacterial regulation of colony development in the closest living relatives of animals.

ABSTRACT

Bacterially-produced small molecules exert profound influences on animal health, morphogenesis, and evolution through poorly understood mechanisms. In one of the closest living relatives of animals, the choanoflagellate Salpingoeca rosetta, we find that colony development is induced by the prey bacterium Algoriphagus machipongonensisand its close relatives in the Bacteroidetes phylum. Here we show that a rosette inducing factor (RIF-1) produced by A. machipongonensis belongs to the small class of sulfonolipids, obscure relatives of the better known sphingolipids that play important roles in signal transmission in plants, animals and fungi. RIF-1 has extraordinary potency (femtomolar, or 10^-15 M) and S. rosetta can respond to it over a broad dynamic range – nine orders of magnitude. This study provides a prototypical example of bacterial sulfonolipids triggering eukaryotic morphogenesis and suggests molecular mechanisms through which bacteria may have contributed to the evolution of animals.
© 2012 Phys.org
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Choose the Right Food for Your Pet

MISSION, KS, Aug 02, 2012 (MARKETWIRE via COMTEX) — (Family Features)

When it comes to caring for your pet, you do everything you can to ensure they stay happy and healthy. And while there are a variety of pet foods on the market boasting recipes made using wholesome ingredients, if pets aren’t digesting that food correctly, they may as well be eating the inexpensive fillers you’ve been trying to avoid.

In fact, many pet owners don’t know their dogs and cats have sensitive stomachs, which may make it hard for them to properly digest their current food, and could lead to a host of problems. “Pets need consistency, they need to eat the same food every day to avoid digestive upset,” explains Dr. Al Townshed, staff veterinarian with Holistic Select natural pet food, “If pets can’t absorb the nutrients in the food they eat, it can lead to malnutrition, lethargy, frequent vomiting and worse.”

The good news is there are pet foods on the market that offer well-balanced, easily digestible nutrients. With this in mind, Dr. Townshend shares these tips for choosing the right food for your pet:

Check the Label Look for natural, wholesome ingredients and avoid fillers. Remember, while proteins, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals all play an important role in the health benefits of your pet’s diet, there are other ingredients to consider to help ensure your pet is properly absorbing these key nutrients.

Probiotics Your pet’s digestive tract requires a careful balancing act of bacteria. Probiotics — or good bacteria — help keep your pet’s immune system healthy. Cat and dog foods like Holistic Select natural pet food contain live probiotics that are added to the food after it has been cooked and cooled. This process assures maximum survival of the probiotics, so that your pet reaps the full benefits of their food.

Prebiotics Prebiotics stimulate the growth and maintenance of good bacteria, like probiotics, in your pet’s digestive tract. Examples of prebiotics include beet pulp and inulin, which is a fructose found in plant roots and is believed to aid in the absorption of calcium and magnesium, according to a 2005 study published by the National Institutes of Health.

Natural Fibers Just as fiber plays an important role in human digestive health, it also plays an integral role in your pet’s digestive health. Fiber-rich foods such as oatmeal and flaxseed promote digestive regularity. Flaxseed, for example, helps with the movement of food through your pet’s digestive tract, is rich in Omega 3 fatty acids, and offers benefits for your pet’s cardiovascular, endocrine and immune systems.

Easily Digestible Enzymes Several organs such as the pancreas help break down food within the digestive process by producing enzymes. Adding enzymes to pet food actually helps with this process by ensuring your pet is getting the nutrients from their food, while reducing stress on their organs — this is especially crucial for aging pets.

When it comes to choosing a pet food for your dog or cat, keep in mind that more than just the main ingredients matter. Ensure your pet is getting the maximum amount of nutrition from every bite by purchasing quality foods such as the line from Holistic Select, which is the only pet food with a complete digestive support system.

To learn more about the importance of digestive health for your pet, visit www.HolisticSelect.com .

About Family Features Editorial Syndicate This and other food and lifestyle content can be found at www.editors.familyfeatures.com . Family Features is a leading provider of free food and lifestyle content for use in print and online publications. Register with no obligation to access a variety of formatted and unformatted features, accompanying photos, and automatically updating Web content solutions.

        Matthew Barksdale
        mbarksdale@familyfeatures.com
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SOURCE: Holistic Select
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Copyright 2012 Marketwire, Inc., All rights reserved.

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